Volume 11 1902 > Index to Vol. XI, p 267-270
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- 267 INDEX TO VOL. XI.
  • Admiralty Islands natives, their numeration, 6
  • Ahi-mahitihiti or Ahi-rere, a war-ceremony, 47
  • Albinos (mahele) of Niue Island, 167
  • “Alfuros” of the Moluccas, affinity with Maoris, 183
  • Alito, a talisman, 176
  • Ambuscades in Maori warfare, 226
  • Andaman Islanders and Australian natives, their numeration, 5
  • Annual meeting, Minutes of, xii
  • Annual report of the Council, xii
  • Antiquities Act, The Maori, 42
  • Arawa migration, The, 253
  • Art of war, as conducted by the Maori. Elsdon Best, 11, 47, 127, 219
  • Aryan cognates of lima (five), 6
  • Asiatic words representing both “five” and “hand,” 1
  • Atiu, the pua game of (note), 191
  • Atkinson, A. S., F.L.S. (obituary note). 264
  • Atua of the Maori, 63
  • Australian natives, probable origin of the, 119
  • Axes, stone, of Manahaki (note), 262
  • Balance-sheet of the Society, xiv
  • Baptism, Polynesian ceremony of, 20
  • Best, Elsdon. Notes on the art of war, as conducted by the Maori of New Zealand (continued from vol. x), 11, 47, 127, 119
  • Birds of Niue, 101
  • Birds, warning cries of, 36
  • Birth, Niue beliefs and ceremonies connected with, 203
  • Birth-omens, 36
  • Botany of Niue, 87
  • Brodrick, T. N., Canoe-making in olden times (notes), 124, 192
  • Cannibalism, Maori, 71;—unknown in Niue, 208
  • Canoe-making in olden times (notes), 124, 192
  • Canoes and fishing, Niue, 215
  • Ceremonial use of fern-fronds and karamu leaves (note), 174
  • Ceremonies, curious, to remove penalty for broken tapu and restore seership, 51
  • Ceremony of Polynesian baptism, 20, 203
  • Chasm of Matapa, Niue (with illustration), 83
  • Chiefs' words and common words (Niue) compared, 177
  • Chieftainship in Niue, 170
  • Children, Dedication of, 20, 203
  • Christmas Island, one of Cocos Group, 10
  • Climate of Niue, 105
  • Clothing and ornaments of Niue Islanders, 216
  • Clothing worn in battle and in ceremonies, 68
  • Coco-nut, Legend of its introduction to Niue, 96
  • Cocos (or Keelings) Islands, The. Translated from a paper by M. de la Croix, 9
  • Constitution of Society, i
  • Contents, Table of, iii
  • Cowie, Right Rev. Dr. W. G. (obituary note), 190
  • Croix, M. de la. Notes on the Cocos (or Keelings) Islands, 9
  • Customs of Niue Islanders, 202
  • Dead, beliefs and customs respecting the, 206
  • Dedication of Maori children, 20
  • Diseases of Niue Islanders, 218
  • Divination and prophecy, 28
  • Divination by casting fernstalks (niu), 38; by fire, 38; by human sacrifice, 39; by the raurau, 39
  • Dryness of the throat (miti aitua), an evil omen, 28
  • Emerson, J. E. The Leina-kauhane in in Hawaii (note), 192
  • Enumeration, Vigesimal system of, 260
  • Exchanges, List of, x
  • Expressions pertaining to war, 132
  • Fauna of Niue, 99
  • Fighting, Maori modes of, 221
  • Fishes of Niue, 103
  • Fishing and canoes, Niue, 215
  • “Five,” Polynesian equivalents for, 1; same words used for “hand,” 1; Asiatic parallels, 1
  • “Flying-fish,” Slaying the—a native custom, 16
  • Food on the war-trail, 70
  • Food-plants of Niue, 91; food of the islanders, 217
  • Fraser, John, LL.D. The Polynesian numerals one, five, ten, 1, 107
  • Games and amusements Niue, 217
  • Genealogy: Tu—Pio te Tihi, 65
  • Greenstone relic found at Niue (note), 263
  • Gudgeon, Lieut-Col., C.M.G. The whence of the Maori, 179, 247; Stone axes of Manahiki (note), 262
  • Hair of the Niue people, 165
  • Hamilton, A. Ancient Hawaiian stone implements (review), 257
  • “Hand,” same word as “five” in Polynesian, 1; Asiatic parallels, 1; root-word of “hand,” “to grasp,” 2; the word lima found distributed through Melanesia, Polynesia, Papua, and Indonesia, 7
  • Hawaiian beliefs regarding spirits (note), 44, 192
  • Hawaiian stone implements, 257
  • “Hawaiki,” constant recurrence of the name, 180
  • Hirihiri tapa and ngau paepae, curious ceremonies after breach of tapu, 51
  • “House of misfortune” (whare o aitua), Maori phrase for the womb, 22
  • Houses of Niue Islanders, 216
  • Human sacrifice among Maoris, 16
  • Ihu taua (“flying-fish”), slaying the, 16
  • Ikapoto, Te, Song of. 33
  • Implements, Ancient Hawaiian stone, 257
  • Imarangi or papakura (red glow on horizon), an omen, 33
  • Infanticide practised by Niue Islanders, 205
  • Insects of Niue, 105
  • Jackson, F. A. (obituary note), 190
  • Kai-parapara, a breach of tapu, 18
  • - 268
  • Kai-pirau (exhuming and devouring decomposing human bodies), a form of insult, 15,72
  • Kale and Veka (birds), Legend of the, 101
  • Kapo (to “clutch”), an insult, 134
  • Keelings (or Cocos) Islands, named after the discoverer, Capt. Keeling (1608), 10
  • Lament, a (Atiawa tribe), 121;—for Te Pukenui, 30
  • Lamh (Gaelic) allied to Polynesian lima (hand), 7
  • Landslip, an evil omen, 31
  • Language of Niue, a dialect of Polynesian, 163
  • Large, J. T. The vigesimal system of enumeration, 260
  • Leaves, Ceremonial use of (note), 174
  • Legend (Maori) of origin of war, 11;— (Niue) of the Veka and the Kale, 101
  • Leina-Rauhane of Hawaii (notes), 44, 192
  • Lima (“five” or “hand”), Etymology of, 5; Aryan cognates of, 6; extensive distribution of the word, 7; probably allied to Gaelic lamh, 7
  • List of exchanges, x; of officers and members, i, ii
  • Lullaby or oriori, 23
  • Malayo-Polynesian Controversy, The, 113
  • Manahaki, Stone axes of (note), 262
  • Manaia, Suggested etymology of the word (with illustration). E. Tregear, 76
  • Manners and customs of Niue Islanders, 206
  • Maori Antiquities Act 1901, The, 42
  • Maori art of war, 11, 47, 127, 219
  • Maori atua, 63
  • Maori children, dedication of, 20
  • Maori, The whence of the, 179, 247
  • Maori, Wide distribution of the racial name, 186
  • Marriage Customs of Niue Islanders, 206
  • Maxwell,—. Greenstone relic found at Niue (note), 263
  • Mayas of Central America, their system of numeration, 5
  • Members of Society, List of, ii
  • Migrations, successive, of the Maori, 252
  • Minutes of annual meeting, xii
  • Miti aitua (throat dryness), a bad omen, 28
  • Motu, a division of the Niue people, 164, 167
  • Navigators, Maori, 180;—Polynesian, 250
  • Niue, Greenstone relic found at (note), 263
  • Niue Island (Niue-fekai) and its people, S. Percy Smith, 80, 163, 195
  • Notes and Queries, 44, 123, 191, 262
  • Notes on the art of war, as conducted by the Maoris of New Zealand. Elsdon Best. 11, 47, 127, 219
  • Numerals (one, five, ten), Polynesian, 1, 107
  • Numeration, Vigesimal system of, 260
  • Obituary—
  • Atkinson, Arthur S., F.L.S., 294
  • Cowie, Right Rev. Dr. W. G., 190
  • Jackson, F. Arthur, 190
  • Tone, N. J., 190
  • Watt, F. F., 190
  • Wilson, D. C., 264
  • Officers of Society, i.
  • Ohi (Niue) = Maori Ngati, 168
  • Omens, 28, 48
  • Oracular utterances of Maori seers, 54
  • Origin of War, Maori legend of, 11
  • Oriori, or Maori lullaby 23
  • Owl, supposed to give warning of danger, 36
  • Papakura or imurangi (red glow on horizon), an omen, 33
  • Patu whakairi (the suspended weapon), 134
  • Peace, Rongo, the Maori deity of, 12
  • Pentalpha, The, used as talismanic sign on pua bowls in Atiu (note), 191
  • Polynesian migrations to New Zealand, 247
  • Polynesian numerals (one, five, ten), The John Fraser, LL.D., 1, 107
  • Polynesians, The, in South America (note), 44
  • Proceedings of the Society, 45, 125, 193, 265
  • Prophecy and divination, 28
  • Proverbs, Maori, pertaining to war, 127
  • Pua game of Atiu (note), 191
  • Pudding, 660 feet long, 218
  • Pukenui, Te, Lament for, 30
  • Purahorua, a secret messenger, 132
  • Queries, Notes and, 44, 123, 191, 262
  • Rapture of Rapatu by a “fish-god” (note) 262
  • Red glow on horizon, an omen, 33
  • Relationship, Niue words denoting, 169
  • Religion of Niue Islanders, 195
  • Reptiles of Niue, 104
  • Revenge, Instances of Maori, 137
  • Review—
  • Ancient Hawaiian Stone Implements, by W. Brigham, A.M. A. Hamilton, 257
  • Right and left, Significance of, 25
  • Roads and tracks in Niue, 86
  • Rongo, the Maori deity of peace, 12
  • Rua koha (summer lightning), an omen, 32
  • Sabean descent of the Maori (Fenton's theory), 186
  • Sacred weapons, 68
  • Sacrifices, Human, among Maoris, 16
  • “Sawaiori,” name invented for Polynesian races by Mr. Whitmere (note), 164
  • Saxton, H. W., F.L.S. (translator). The Cocos or Keeling's Islands, 9
  • Scouting, Maori skill in, 227
  • Second-sight of Maori seers, 53; singular ceremonies to restore when forfeited, 51
  • Shellfish of Niue, 104
  • Shoulder, the right, Symbolism of, 25
  • Signs, omens, prophecy, and divination, 28
  • Skinner, W. H. Canoe-making in olden time (note), 192
  • Smith, S. Percy. Niue Island and its people, 80, 163, 195
  • Sneezing, an evil omen, 36
  • Song of Te Ikapoto, 33
  • Songs, Derisive (whakatea, manawa wera tumoto, kui-oraora, ngeri), 143–153
  • Songs, Charms, and Proverbs—
  • A few of Tuhoe, and Hades shall laugh, 128
  • A human pillow is an unsteady one, 131
  • A lofty mountain I can overpass, 131
  • Alas, alas! the pain of the weapons, 56
  • Alas! the pain that gnaws my vitals, 121
  • Alas! the shame that unnerves me, 50
  • Alas! Where is the company? 56
  • Ara te hoariri, 39
  • Art thou Te Rangikatukua? 59
  • Assembled are the people at the hanging flag, 173
  • Aue, aue! te mamai o te patu, 56
  • Aue! Kai hea ra te rangapu? 55
  • Avert thee, thou paralysing powers, 33
  • Awhitia, awhitia, 59
  • Baptized art thou, child, with the water of Tu-tawake, 22
  • Be thou present, O Tangaloa, 205
  • Behold, the evening star springs up, 153
  • Behold the moon as it rises up, 150
  • Behold thy enemy! 40
  • Birds sleep sound, 129
  • By exalted powers art thou treated, 21
  • By this rite shall be exhaustion, 40
  • By women and land are men lost, 13, 127
  • Compelled by outside winds to fight, 61
  • Do not make your bed too comfortable, 128
  • E hiahia ana au ki kai-mokopuna, 143
  • E hiakai ana au ki te hokowhiti, 146
  • E Hiku! e moe nei, 23
  • E kore te kiore nei, 151
- 269
  • Songs, Charms, &c., continued—
  • E koro, E Puke, 30
  • E Misi Mete, 209
  • E pai ana, E hoa ma, 33
  • E Tu, whiri nuku. E Tu, whiri rangi, 139
  • Engari taku taha e kai koromaki ana, 34
  • Farewell, O Son! You pass with the morning tide, 131
  • Follow each other as the rat does, 129
  • Give me my girdle, 70
  • Go and fight at Wharekura, 128
  • Haere atu ki Mangareporepo, 37
  • Haere! kia hiki ai koe i nga kuri a Pohokura, 130
  • Haere ra, e tama e! Mou te tai ata,moku te tai po, 131
  • He iti na Tuhoe, e kata te Po, 128
  • He kotahi na Tanewharerangi, 128
  • He manawa te tina, 70
  • He maunga tiketike, ka taea e au, 131
  • He maurea kia whiria, 128
  • He paenga paraoa ki te ana nei, ki Tiki-tiki, 146
  • He toa taua, mate taua, 127
  • He toa taua, he toa pahekeheke, 127
  • He ua ki te po he paewai ki te ao, 134
  • He upoko-kaka no Taurua, no Tamarehe, 147
  • He urunga tangata, he urunga panekeneke, 131
  • He wahine, he whenua, e ngaro ai te tangata, 13, 127
  • He who is but a warrior will fall, 127
  • Homai taku maro kia hurua, 70
  • Honoa te hono a te kiore, 129
  • Hurihia ki muri ki to tuara, 58
  • I hoki mai koe, E Te Whenuanui, 142
  • I hunger for the seventy twice-told, 147
  • It is well, O my friends, 34
  • It was arranged that Tumuriwai should be killed, 128
  • Ka hua au ki te kowha e huaki nei no wai, 145
  • Ka hua hau ki te tangata nei, 74
  • Ka iri ki te whata o Hotunuku, 27
  • Ka mahia ki nga mahi nunui, 21
  • Ka moe te mata ki tuna, 127
  • Ka ora karikari aruhe, 70
  • Ka tohia koe tama ki te wai o Tutawake, 22
  • Ka tuhera te tawaha o te riri, 133
  • Kahikatea rakau kei te kakau, 244
  • Kai te umu te ruhi, 40
  • Kaore e whakama e pahunu noa nei, 50
  • Kaore te mamae ngau kino i roto ra, 121
  • Karanga riri, ka karangatia Paeko, 130
  • Kaua e aroarorua, 50
  • Kaua e whakapai te moenga, 128
  • Kaua tatou e tukua kia mate a whare, 128
  • Kia hapai patu koe, 21
  • Kia teletele totonu, 204
  • Kia tu ai a Tagaloa, 204
  • Kia tuputupu nunui e koe, 26
  • Kiki a waha ta Rakaihakeke, 130
  • Korikori tama ki tua, 20
  • Ko te moe a te manu, 129
  • Ko Te Rangikatukua koe? 59
  • Ko te tohi nuku, ko te tohi rangi, ko te tohi riri, 25
  • Ko te tupe o Tu, korte tupe o Rongo, 24
  • Ko wai e korero nei i taku poho? 149
  • Ko wai te waka e? 57
  • Kua fenoga he Iki ki Tamahaleleka, 172
  • Kuia Togia ke he toa, 166
  • Kumea! Toia te roroa o te tangata, 153
  • Leave the fish of the line, 129
  • Leave the man of the dry birds alone, 130
  • Let man die like the shark, 128
  • Let us carry a stone and set it up, 171
  • Like a weka escaping, 129
  • Lilolilo to ua ke fakaloka, 217
  • Linger not by the fire of Pawhero, 131
  • Lissom be the boy, through the tua, 20
  • Look yonder at Tarakumukumu, 61
  • Man passes, but land endures, 130
  • Songs, Charms, &c., continued—
  • Mate a mahina, mate ala mai, 217
  • May thou grow large, 26
  • Me kawe te Wharekura, ki te ururua, 128
  • Me mate a ururoa te tangata, 128
  • Me te weka ka motu i te mahanga, 119
  • Mine was the weapon left in the house, 129
  • Mo a muri, mo a nehe, 134
  • Mo Tumuriwai te kupu, 128
  • Monu Tagaloa! 200
  • Naku te ake i waiho i te whare, 120
  • Nga morehu ma te kai e patu, 153
  • Nothing but the rain of heaven shall descend upon you, 131
  • Now does the tua affect this child, 21
  • O Hiku, that sleepest there, 23
  • O Sir! O Puke! 30
  • O Tagaloa, with smoothness, with ease, 202
  • O Tu, earth-shaker! o Tu, heaven-shaker, 140
  • Parched with vain regrets is my throat, 60
  • Pinohia ki te kohatu, 152
  • Place hot stones to cook his head, 152
  • Rely on the powers below, the powers above, 22
  • Suspended on the stage of Hotunuku, 27
  • Tagaloa, tilitili, 202
  • Taka mua, taka muri, 129
  • Taku aroha ki a Te Haraki, 154
  • Taputapuatea, kia ngohi i te iti, 129
  • Te kotiritiri, te kotaratara, 143
  • Te pokai marearea, 130
  • Te rahui kawau ki roto o Wairau, 130
  • Te tohu takoto a Ngaiteriu, 130
  • Tena tua ka eke kai runga kai tenei tamaiti, 21
  • Tenei to kiri kei te whakamirei, 134
  • Tera Tawera ka mahuta i te pae, 152
  • Tera te marama hikitia ake, 150
  • The digger of fernroot has abundance, 70
  • The fisherman sleeps, 127
  • The flavour alone remains for Whakarau, 52
  • The flock of shags at Wairau, 130
  • The kamapiu shrub that stands at Tafalimahina, 173
  • The populace has gathered at Paluki, 172
  • The portentous lightning flashes on the mountain, 145
  • The rat will not, when liberated, 151
  • The shoal of whitebait, 130
  • The tua is possessed, is held, 26
  • The warrior and the cragsman, 127
  • This is the sacred charm of Tu, 24
  • Those parrot-heads of Taurua and Tamarehe, 148
  • Through women and land are men lost, 13, 127
  • Thou returnest, O Te Whenuanui, 142
  • Tirohia atu Tarakumukumu, 61
  • 'Tis the baptism of earth, of heaven, of war, 25
  • To die like the moon, 217
  • To uplift thy weapons, 21
  • Tokotokona na te hau tawaho, 60
  • Tomina noa atu taka kaki, 60
  • Towards Kaimokopuna are my thoughts directed, 144
  • Tu ki tupua, Tu ki tawhito, 22
  • Tua kai te whiwhia, kai te rawea, 26
  • Tuhoe, moumou kai, moumou taonga, 128
  • Tuhoe, wasters of food and property, 128
  • Tukairanga, hangaa he moari, 154
  • Tulai o, piupiu o, 198
  • Turn now thy thoughts behind thy back, 58
  • 'Twas like the stranding of whales, 146
  • Twist thy muscles to retain, 217
  • Waiho i kona te ika a te aho, 129
  • Waiho i kona te tangata o te paka maroke,130
  • Wairoa engulfs myriads, 130
  • Wairoa tapoko rau, 130
  • War is declared—we look not on the gates of life, 133
  • Whakaha kau ana a whakarau, 52
  • Whakataha ra koe e te anewa o te rangi e tu nei, 33
  • What canoe is that? 58
- 270
  • Songs, Charms, &c., continued—
  • Whatu ngarongaro he tangata, toitu he whenua, 130
  • When it rains at night the eel may be taken, 134
  • Who is this that moves me inwardly? 149
  • Soudan languages—their Polynesian affinities, 186
  • South America, traces of Polynesians in (note), 44
  • Spirits, Hawaiian beliefs regarding (notes), 44, 192
  • Stone implements, ancient Hawaiian, 257
  • Summer lightning (rua koha), an omen, 32
  • Table of contents, iii
  • Tafito, a division of the Niue people, 164, 167
  • Taharua, a person related to two hostile tribes, 220
  • Takiri and tamaki (omens), 34
  • Talismans: the Niue alito, Maori mauri, 176
  • Tangi, He (no Ngatiawa), 121
  • Tatau, Tahitian word corrupted to “tattoo” (note), 208
  • Tattooing, not a custom of Niue people, 208
  • Ten, the numeral, 107
  • Terms and expressions pertaining to war, 132
  • Throat, Dryness of the, ominous, 28
  • Toa tree (“sheoak”), The (note), 123
  • Tohi, Ceremony of, 22
  • Tone, N. J. Canoe-making in olden times (note), 124
  • Tone, N. J. (obituary note), 190
  • Tools and utensils of Niue Islanders, 216
  • Traditions: modern Polynesian supplies them from his imagination, 189;—Maori and Samoan compared, 249
  • Tregear, E. Manaia, 7; Rapture of Rapati (note), 262
  • Tu, Maori war-god, 12; male children dedicated to, in baptismal ceremony, 20
  • Tu-ora, ceremony of, 20
  • V (five), a diagram of thumb and fing 5
  • Veka and Kale, Legend of the, 101
  • Vigesimal system of numeration, The. J. T. Large, 260
  • Villages of Niue, 85
  • Voyages of the ancient Maoris, 180
  • Wallace on Malays and Polynesians, 182
  • War, Art of, as conducted by the Maoris, 11, 47 127, 219
  • War, Maori legend of origin of, 11
  • Warfare and weapons of Niue Islanders, 210
  • War-god, Tu, the Maori, 12
  • Warnings from cries of birds, 36
  • Warriors, Famous Maori, 219
  • Watt, F. F. (obituary note), 190
  • Weapons of the Maori, 229;—sacred, 68
  • Whence of the Maori, The. Lieut-Col. Gudgeon, 179, 247
  • White, Taylor. Note on the “sheoak” or toa tree, 123
  • Wilson, D. C. (obituary note), 264
  • Woman in the Moon, The. Siberian version (note), 123
  • Womb termed whare o aitua (house of misfortune), 22
  • Women in war, 75
INSETS.

(Illustrations to Article on Niue.)

  • Chart of the Island, facing 79
  • View of Coastline west from Alofi Bay. Matapa Chasm, 83
  • Alofi Village. Kalifa and Maota trees, 86
  • Group of School-teachers, 163
  • Native weapons, 210
  • Articles of Native manufacture, 212
  • Hiapo, or bark-cloth, 214
  • Fata-a-iki, Niue head-chief, 215

Wellington, N.Z.:

Printed for the Society by Whitcombe & Tombs Limited.

1903.