Volume 19 1910 > Index to Vol. XIX, p 227-230
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- 227 INDEX TO VOL. XIX.
  • Adventure of Te Whare-pouri, 12
  • Ahu (now Oahu) in ancient Hawaiian poetry, identified with the Ahu which has an important place in Maori Migration traditions, 141
  • Aipitaroa-a-Nui-a-Parara. Rata, 186
  • Aniwaniwa and Ruaroa, a legend of Pukeariki pa, 37
  • Annual meeting of the Society, viii.
  • Annual report of the Council, viii.
  • Apakura, wife of Vaea, Rarotongan Legend of, 155
  • Are-korero Teia no Rata-Ariki, 158
  • Ariihoehau, the last ordained Arii-rahi of Tahiti (1822), 40
  • Ari'is in Tahiti. Tati Salmon, 40
  • Aryan and Polynesian Points of Contact. S. Percy Smith, 84
  • Aweawe saved from massacre by Tungia, 15
  • Balance-sheet of the Society, x.
  • Barrett, Richard; his part in the defence of Otaka, 26
  • Barrett and Love, their settlement at Nga-Motu, 1
  • Best, Elsdon. Maori Star-names, 97; Poe, a name for the tui (note), 223; The pump drill (query), 224
  • Breadfruit tree, The, in Maori tradition. James Cowan, 94
  • Breath not to be taken in recitation of Polynesian incantations; an ancient custom also of Aryan peoples, 138
  • Broughton's discovery of Chatham Islands (named after his ship), and native account of his visit (1790), 216
  • Bundy, Billy, whaler, made tapu, and his life saved by a chief's daughter who afterwards became his wife, 27; his part in the defence of Otaka, 26
  • Cannibal feast at fall of Puke-rangiora, many Waikato invaders said to have died from gorging, 21
  • Cannon, three, used in defence of Otaka, 27; still in existence at New Plymouth (note), 27
  • Cardrona steam, native name Orau, 121
  • Chatham Islands, The Moriori People of, 206; migration to (1835), 126; occupied by a mixed people from Taranaki, 209
  • Chiefs taken by traders as passengers to Sydney, 1, 2
  • Christianity, its introduction into Waikato, 66
  • Contact, points of, Aryan and Polynesian, 84
  • Cowan, James. The breadfruit tree in Maori tradition, 94
  • Customs of the Maoris; treatment of slaves, 61
  • Dances, Ancient Polynesian, their sacred and dramatic character, 137
  • Death of Rata, Legend of, 154
  • Downes, T. W. The Whatu-Kura, 218
  • Easter Island (Rapa-nui) and Rapa (Rapa-iti) Island. S. Percy Smith, 171
  • Emerson, Dr. M. B., an authority on Hawaiian ceremonies and poetry, 137; review of his book, “Unwritten Literature of Hawaii,” 137
  • Exchanges, List of, vi.
  • Exiles' return to their Taranaki homes; lament at sight of Taranaki's snow-clad peak, 135
  • “Fat Book,” The (early N.Z. Company's officers' reports), 1
  • Fighting between the migrants and the Whanga-nui and Waikato natives, 54
  • Fiji and Tonga, References to, in ancient Maori poems (note), 51
  • Genealogies—
  • Aka-aro-roa—Te Hau-te-horo, 211
  • Hotorua—Wairangi (and descendants)
  • Rata-Ariki—Tarao-Nooau, 156
  • Rata—Tapitu-kura, 157
  • Tiotio—Huria Matenga, 119
  • Vai-takere—Rata-Ariki, 143
  • Genealogies in Uenuku line, New Zealand and Rarotonga—Tahitian, compared, 91
  • Genealogy cultivated as a science in Tahiti, 43
  • Guard, “Jack,” master of the “Harriet,” wrecked at Cape Egmont in 1834 (note) 17; his story of the wreck and the capture of his wife and children, 101
  • Hadfield, Rev. O., arrived at Waikanae (1839), 132
  • Hao-whenua, Fight of (1834), 77; peace arranged between Waikato invaders and the Ati-Awa, 80
  • “Harriet Beach,” Wreck of the (1834), 102
  • “Hauhaua” heke or migration, 58
  • Hawaii, unwritten literature of, 137
  • “Heke-whiri-nui,” migration of Ati-Awa so called, 3
  • Hika-nui, high-born woman of Ngati-Te-Whiti, given to Love as a wife, 2
  • History and Traditions of the Taranaki Coast (continued from vol. xviii.), 1, 47, 101, and concluded
  • Hongi Hare. Ruatapu, son of Uenuku, 89
  • Hula, Sacred songs of the, 137
  • Ika-tere, Ngati-Maru chief who did not leave Upper Waitara with the migration; his lament, 51
  • Internecine troubles among refugee tribes, 110
  • Io, the Atua-mekameka or God of good of Rarotonga, 144
  • Kaiapohia (misnamed “Kaiapoi”), Siege of (1831), 37
  • Kai-oraora, or cursing song, concerning Tikawe, 48
  • Kanga-rangi, her tangi for the dead, 23; her fate, 23
  • Kapara-te-hau, near Wairau, the lake now known as Grassmere, 114; Rau-paraha sustains reverse there at hands of Ngai-Tahu (1835), 114
  • Kauai (formerly Tauai) in north-west of Hawaii group identified with Tawai, the island in “Hawaiki” of Maori tradition, whence the kumara was obtained, 138
  • Kauri, Te, village once with large population, at Mokau (note), 17
  • Kokakoka, old cripple who defeated the plot of the Ngati-Tama, 7
  • Kingston, at south end of Lake Whakatipu, native name Takere-haka, 121
- 228
  • Kirtle Burn, native name Tititea, 121
  • Kuititanga, Te, near Waikanae, last fight between Ngati-Rau-kawa and Ati-Awa (1839) 127; precise date uncertain, 132
  • Kuku-rarangi, noted seer of Te Kuititanga; his prophecy, 130
  • Kumu-kahi in Hawaii (Maori, Tumu-tahi), 141
  • Kuru, or breadfruit tree: the name preserved by the Maoris in ancient songs, 94
  • Lament on Te Ohanga-i-tua, 11; on Whatitiri, Pekapeka, and others who fell at Pukerangiora, 23; on Pehi-Tu-korehu, 34, 35; of Te Ika-tere on the migration from Waitara in 1832, 51; by Te Heuheu over his brother Papaka, 79; for slain at Te Ruaki, 69; for Pouoho, 125
  • Leverd, A. (translator). Paumotu verison of the story of Rata, 176
  • List of exchanges, vi.
  • Literature, Unwritten, of Hawaii, 137
  • Lizard device in Maori and other carvings; suggestions as to its origin and significance (notes by Editor and Mr. W. H. Skinner), 225
  • Love, John, early trader from Sydney (1828-29), 1; his part in the defence of Otaka, 26
  • “Manuatere,” a canoe of the Migration in great renown at Tahiti, 45
  • Maori Star-names. Elsdon Best, 97
  • Marshall, W. B., R.N., his account of visits to New Zealand in H.M.S. “Alligator” (1834) 102
  • Massacre of Ngati-Kahu-ngunu at Wai-kanae, 14
  • Massacre of Ohariu (1835), 112
  • Mata-katea, Taranaki chief, his heroism, 63, 72; his brother adopts the name of Ngatai-rakau-nui, 65
  • “Matatua” canoe, Tahitian tradition concerning, 45
  • Members of the Society, i.
  • Migration of the Ngati-awa (1832) known as “Tama-te-Uaua,” 49
  • Mikotahi, Sugarloaf Islands, illustration of (facing), 59; siege of (1833), 58; truce negotiated by Koro-piki, 60
  • Minarapa, native teacher and peacemaker, 123
  • Moa; occurrence of bones of certain of the smaller species in forests (note by Mr. W. W. Smith), 222; stories concerning the killing of “the last moa” (note by Mr. G. Davies), 223
  • Moriori people of the Chatham Islands, The (continued from vol. vii.). Chapter xv., conclusion, 206. Moriori history preserved in one of the Maori Whare-wananga, only recently available, explains many difficulties, 206
  • Motu-tawa, Second siege of (1832), 47
  • Mount Pisa, native name Tara-puta, 121
  • Navigator Islands, Project of Atiawa leaders to invade and subdue, 111
  • Nevis stream, native name Papa-puni 121,
  • New Guinea; discovery of pottery and decorated stone bowls and images deeply buried in the earth, the work of an ancient people more highly developed than the present inhabitants (note by Editor), 223
  • Nga-Motu pa, Map of (facing 1); defence of, 25; British defenders of, 26
  • Nga-teko pa, 70: illustration (facing) 70
  • Nga-whakawa, brother-in-law of Te Puoho, who saved his life at Ohariu massacre, 113; sole survivor at slaughter at Tuturau (near Gore) where Te Puoho was slain; his extraordinary solitary journey of over five hundred miles through rough and hostile country to Parapara (Massacre Bay) 124
  • Nganaoa, Rata's priest and wonder-worker, 149
  • Ngati-Raukawa, An ancestor of, 197, 201
  • Ngati-Tama, their plot to massacre the Ngati-Kuhu-ngunu, at Wai-rarapa, frustrated, 10
  • Niniko, Te, Story of, compared with Aryan legend of Vikrama and Urvasi, Greek myth of Eros and Psyche, etc., 86
  • Noho, lit., “sitting”; its significance, to settle down or dwell (note), 133
  • Noho-mai-tua, Ngati-Kahu-ngunu chief slain at Pehi-katia, probably identical with Ohanga-i-tua, 11
  • Notes and Queries, 222
  • Oaoiti, guardian of Mrs. Guard, treacherously seized and seriously wounded by “Alligator's” landing-party, 104; his death (1834) 109
  • Ohanga-i-tua, slain at Pehi-katia; lament upon, 11
  • Ohangai, old Maori pa, beautiful and beautifully kept, 67
  • Ohariu massacre (1835), 112
  • Old order changes after 1839, and exiles of Taranaki and Ati-Awa return, 135
  • “One-poto,” small cannon used in defence of Otaka (note), 27
  • Oparo, otherwise Rapa-iti, an island where a dialect of Maori is spoken—the only Polynesian island where hills are crowned with fortified pas of the Maori type, 171
  • Orangi-tua-peka or Nga-ngutu-maioro pa, 70; illustration (facing), 70
  • O-raumoa, Tory Channel; defeat of Te Rau-paraha by the Ngai-Tahu, 116
  • Otaka or Nga-Motu pa, Map of (facing), 1; defence of, 25
  • “Pae-a-huri, Te,” a Ngati-rahiri canoe, 1
  • Paka-kutu, Otaki, Battle of (1834), 75
  • Papaka, slain at Hao-whenua, 78; lament over, 79
  • Pare-whete, wife of Wairangi, Legend of her flight, 201
  • Parley between Te Heuheu and Rangi-wahia, 55
  • “Paukena” heke or migration, 58
  • Paumotu version of the story of Rata. Translated by A. Leverd, 176
  • Peace established between the Nga-Motu hapu and the Ngati-Kahu-ngunu, 14; between the Ngai-Tahu and Ngati-Toa, 117
  • Pehi-katia pa, Wai-rarapa, captured from Ngati-Kahu-ngunu (1830), 10
  • Pehi-Tu-korehu, Ngati-Mania-poto fighting chief; Rev. James Hamlin's diary note concerning his death (1836), 34; lament on his death, 34, 35
  • Pele, Maori equivalent, Para. Pele legends of Hawaii connected with the group of Polynesian Deluge-legends, and showing affinities with Asiatic astronomical myths, 140
  • Period, The, of Rata, 195
  • Poe, a name for the tui (note by Mr. Elsdon Best), 223
  • Polack's story of siege of Otaka, 28
  • Polynesian and Aryan points of contact, 84
  • Poro, name applied to various plants of the solanum genus in New Zealand, Tahiti, and Rarotonga, 95
  • Port Cooper, native name Te Waka-raupo, 114
  • Port Underwood, native names Whanganui and Kakata, 115
  • Proceedings of the Society, 100, 169, 226
  • Proper names in ancient Polynesian songs; instance of their retention as common nouns in traditional poetry in Hawaii, the forms surviving the memory of their significance, 139
  • “Pu-poipoi,” small cannon used in defence of Otaka, taken by Waikato invaders who overcharged it, whereby it burst, breech-block now in New Plymouth Museum (note), 27
  • Puke-ariki (spittle) pa; tradition of how its name was obtained, 37
- 229
  • Puke-rangiora pa, Fall of (1831) 15
  • “Pump-drill”; this device in use among Polynesians (query by Mr. Elsdon Best), 224
  • Puoho (full name Te-Puoho-o-te-Rangi); his wives, 125; concerned in massacre at Ohariu, where he rescued Nga-whakawa; confounded by Mr. Travers with Ngati-Toa chief Rawiri Puaha (note), 114; his adventurous raid to the West Coast of the South Island, 118; a wonderful undertaking not equalled in Maori history; its disastrous issue and Puoho's death (1836), 122; lament by Kauhoe, his widow, 125
  • “Pupu-kare-kawa,” a noted taniwha of Wairarapa (note), 13
  • Putiki-whara-nui pa, Attack on (1829), 4; the pa besieged and taken, 5
  • Queries, Notes and, 222
  • “Ra-makiri, Te,” canoe taken at Pehi-katia, afterwards given to Rau-paraha, 11
  • Rangihiroa, Te, M.P., translator. Wairangi, 201
  • Ralph, T., of Mokau, agent of a trader, taken prisoner in 1831 by a large Waikato warparty, 17
  • Rangi-pito's account of the “Tama-te-Uaua” migration, 50
  • Rapa Island (Rapa-iti), 171
  • Rarotongan version of the story of Rata. Stephen Savage, 142
  • Rata, Rarotongan version of the story of, 142, 158; Paumotu version of the story, 176, 186; the period of, 195
  • Rau-paraha's exterminating policy, 110
  • Rawiri Te Maire's story of Te Puoho's great march through Otago, 120
  • Rere-tawhangawhanga, noted Taranaki chief (died 1843), 5
  • Rig-Veda; some of its legends paralleled in Polynesian mythology, 85
  • “Rimutaka,” an erroneous form, properly Remutaka (note), 7
  • “Rodney” brig, seized by Port Nicholson natives for Chatham Island raid, 127
  • “Rua-kotare, Te,” a Ngati-te-Whiti canoe, 2
  • “Rua-koura,” a small cannon used in defence of Otaka (note), 27
  • Ruanui and his whale, 92
  • Ruatapu, son of Uenuku. Hare Hongi, 89
  • Runners, their swiftness and endurance in conveying tidings, 7
  • Sacred character of old Polynesian dances, 137
  • Sacred songs of the Hula, 137
  • Salmon, Tati. On Ari'is in Tahiti, 39
  • Savage, Stephen. Rarotongan version of Rata, 142
  • Siege of Putiki, 4; of Puke-rangiora, 15; of Otaka, 25; of Kaiapohia, 37; of Te Ruaki pa (1834), 67; of Waimate pa (1833), 70; illustrations of the locality (facing), 70
  • Skeleton with taiaha found near Whakaea by a shepherd in 1863; identified as one of Te Puoho's taua lost in 1836, 122
  • Skinner, H. D. Relics showing settled occupation of Lake Wanaka district by Maoris (note), 224; The “lizard” in Maori carvings (note), 225
  • Smith, S. Percy. Aryan and Polynesian points of contact, 84; Easter Island (Rapanui) and Rapa (Rapa-iti) Island, 171
  • Smith, W. W. Moa bones in forests (note), 222
  • Soap, with flour and sugar, from “Harriet” wreck, cooked in Maori ovens by Taranaki natives (1834), 109
  • Songs, charms, proverbs, etc.—
  • A papa-enaena, wai hau, 139
  • Ahiri a huri e, huri mai te pora, 191
  • As I sit here, screened off by the ocean, 136
  • At the first comes the battle, the third and the fourth, 204
  • Aua e tinainai ia nga manu, 153
  • Aue taka tane! taku tane! 82
  • Songs, charms, etc.—Continued.
  • Before my eyes the plain of Kaingaroa lies, 213
  • Behold the dark cloud dashing on Okakawa, 24
  • Come hither, To'ohiti-mataroa, 180
  • Defeated will be Rangi-hape, 204
  • Do not tempt voyagers lest you be outwitted, 153
  • E aroha ore o maua. 194
  • E Fare ura hou Poumariorio, 46
  • E! Ka tete te kakariki! 116
  • E kai noa ana i te kai, 51
  • E tau arii, e tau arii, teie taua, 44
  • Even as I sit at my meals, 51
  • Farepua, raised on pillars of ura, 40
  • Farepua, ua raaraahia i te ura, 40
  • Fly together, chips of my tree, 179
  • Haere atu ra, E Tama ma! e, 11
  • Haere ki Manga-reporepo-i aha! 54
  • He aha koe i haere mai, 198
  • Hei te tai-rakau-nui ahau, 64
  • Hei Whatitiri aha? Hei Pekapeka aha? 22
  • Homai e ti, homai e ta, 182
  • I karanga mai o te taunga tamaiti a Kairumauanake, 153
  • I will use on Mataoa, my temple, 42
  • Iau nia, iau raro, ia ura te pahi, 187
  • In vain those southern rats with incantations, 125
  • Io, Io! te atua nui ki te rangi tua tini tini, 144
  • Io! the great god of the vast heavens, 144
  • It is Te Aea of every-day fame, 203
  • Join together, come together, 148
  • Ka wa'a o Kane-kalai-honua, 140
  • Ka whakakopura rua a Rangi-hape, 199
  • Kei A-maru, kei whakahua ko te tai o turi, 90
  • Kia mahaki ano te kauae o Poua! (note) 126
  • Ko Te Aea o ia rangi e, 199
  • Ko te rangi-ura a Hine-te-waiwai, 212
  • Koai taku e kite e, 159
  • Kowai koe e haere nei, 9
  • Kua whati te tihi o Tongariro, 55
  • Let us get the stars out of sight, 11
  • Me kowhaki nga whetu, 11
  • My chief, my chief!
  • My land which stays yonder, disappear, 180
  • Nga whenua ka tere mai, nei, 130
  • Now light the fire above at Te Poa, 35
  • O, why didst thou come, 203
  • On a lava-plate, now hot, now cold, 139
  • On the bounding-line of vision, 69
  • Oro hia hoi i te tua no 'Ui, 187
  • Pii hahau, hahau mai e To'ohiti-mataroa, 189
  • Piri mai, piri mai taku maieti, taku maieta, 148
  • Piripiri tapu tu, 188
  • Poumariorio was a Fare ura, 46
  • Puhi kura, puhi kura, puhi kaka, 199
  • Rata-ariki i Vai-o-kura, 153
  • Red feather, red feather, feather of kaka, 203
  • Rere mai, rere mai, te amara o tou raau, 188
  • Sadly the murmuring waters roll, 95
  • Sharpened on 'Ui's sacred back, 178
  • Should my ship go ahead, 177
  • Ta te whakapono pai hoki! 132
  • Tahi ka riri, toru ka wha, 199
  • Tahuna mai te ahi ki runga i a Te Poa, 34
  • Taku pere ra, e tu nei, 48
  • Taku tirotiro noa i te hono tatai, 79
  • Te po i tuku mai, 8
  • Tera te pokeao whakakuru i Okakawa, 23
  • Te tau mai ai to hua kuru, 96
  • Tenei ka noho, ngarohirohi te moana, 135
  • Tera i te pae-whenua, 69
  • Tere ra to totoie, raa hia te taua, 186
  • Teva is the rain, Teva is the wind, 42
  • Teva te ua, Teva te matai, 42
  • The canoe of Kane the world-maker, 140
  • The lands that are hastening hither, 130
  • This is a good standing for Rata, 181
  • Thy totoie does well, in vengeance seeking, 177
  • Totoie, on the crest of the wave slide, 177
  • Totoie, tua vai e a hemo, 177, 186
  • Tou fenua e tu nei, a huna to mata ia aro (moe), 189
  • Tuatia au E Kio', 125
  • Ua hume ihora Teva, 42
- 230
  • Songs, charms, etc.—Continued.
  • Wawa tangi o te moana, 95
  • What of Whatitiri? What of Pekapeka? 22
  • Who are these I behold? 144
  • Spies from Waikato visited Waitara (1831), 16
  • Star-names, Maori, 97
  • “Stockyard” built at Paturau, Nelson, by Te Puoho, wherein to herd the “soft people” of the South that he expected to capture, 124
  • Strange Maori customs in war, 30, 31
  • Tahiti, Ari'is in, 39
  • Taihia, legendary founder of Rarotonga, 44
  • Tainui, in Tahitian, signifies “loud wailing,” equivalent to Maori tanginui, 44
  • “Tama-te-Uaua” migration of the Ngati-Awa (1832), 49
  • Tamati Waka Nene; his march to Kawhia begun in 1819, initiated in the far north a movement which in the late thirties died out in the remotest end of the South Island, 124
  • Taranaki depopulated (1834), 109
  • Taringa-kuri, his part in the defence of Otaka, 30
  • Taungatara, Watene: his account of the early settlement at Nga-Motu, 1
  • “Tawa-tahi,” Paenga-huru's celebrated mere, now lost (note), 9
  • Te-Awa-i-taia, old Maori chief, Christian convert and friend of the pakeha, 133; died in 1866; his obituary notice from “Te Waka Maori,” 134
  • Te Namu pa near Opunake, Siege of (1833), 62; plan of, facing 47; illustrations of, facing 62; abandonment of siege, 64
  • Te-Rau-o-te-Rangi, her swim from Kapiti to the mainland, 111
  • Te Tarata at Wai-rarapa (1829), 6
  • Teva, a Tahitian arii, his story, 42
  • Tikawe, of Motu-tawa, killed and eaten; Te Huia thereupon withdraws from the Ngati-Awa taua; siege of the pa abandoned, 48
  • Tipua, or supposed supernatural powers, of a large totara log at Te Kauri (note), 17
  • Tiwai and Pomare, Episode of, 81
  • “Tohora,” (whale) an early trading vessel, 1; wrecked at O-tai-kokako, 2
  • Toi-te-huatahi, bound for New Zealand, discovered Chatham Islands probably in twelfth century, 206
  • Transactions and proceedings, 100, 169, 226
  • Topeora, and one of her poems, 83
  • Tu-mataueka murdered by the Ngati-Toa, a grievance avenged by the Ngai-Tahu, 113
  • Tungia, at Wai-kanae, saves Te Aweawe from massacre, 15
  • Uenuku, Ruatapu, son of, 89
  • “Unwritten Literature of Hawaii: the Sacred Songs of the Hula,” review, 137
  • Uruhina's lament for the slain at Puke-rangiora, 23
  • Vahie-roa, mother of Rata, Paumotu version of the story, 176
  • “Waikaia,” corrupt spelling of Whakaea, 122
  • Waikato raid in 1834; musket buried at Waitara as token of possession, 66
  • Waikato taua; its panic and ignominious abandonment of siege of Otaka, 32
  • Waimate pa, Siege of, 70; illustrations of, facing, 70
  • Wairangi, an ancestor of Ngati-Raukawa. Collected and translated by Te Rangihiroa from Hitiri te Paerata and others, 201
  • Wairangi, He tipuna no Ngati-Raukawa, 197
  • Wanaka, Lake; traces of former settled Maori occupation in the form of bush clearings, foundations of whares, stone tools and weapons, etc. (note by Mr. H. D. Skinner), 224
  • “Whakarewa,” Te Wherowhero's mere, 21
  • Whangai-hau Ceremony, Account of, 72
  • “Whare-kauri,” (Chatham Island) so named, according to a Maori tradition, from kauri deck-planks of explorer's canoe, used in first houses there erected, 211
  • Whare-pouri, fighting chief in command of defence of Otaka, 27; his adventure, 12
  • Whata-nui, a humane chief in a time of barbarism, 110
  • Whatu-kura, On the. T. W. Downes, 218
  • Whatu-kura, small white stones, used with much ceremony in imparting sacred mysteries, 218; illustration, 221
  • Whiro, Maori ancestor and navigator, known as Hilo in Hawaii, 138
  • Williams, Archdeacon Henry, his diary (1835), 132; his influence as peacemaker, 133
  • Wright, John; his part in defence of Otaka, 26
    INSETS.
  • Map of Otaka or Ngamotu pa, facing 1
  • Map of Te Namu pa, facing 47
  • Miko-tahi Island and pa, from a photograph, facing 59
  • Te Namu and Te Namu-iti, from photographs, facing 62
  • Orangi-tua-peka pa and Nga-teko, from photographs, facing 70
  • Genealogy of Wairangi and his Brothers, folding sheet facing 200