Volume 22 1913 > Index to Vol. XXII, p 233-235
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- 233 INDEX TO VOL. XXII.
  • ALEXANDER, Dr. W. D., Obituary Notice of, iii
  • Ancient Indian Vessels, their likeness to the Polynesian canoe, 24
  • Annual meeting of the Society, i.
  • Annual report of the Council of the Society, i.
  • “Aotea” canoe given to Turi for voyage to New Zealand by Toto, 131
  • Aotea-roa, name given to New Zealand by Kupe, 132
  • Ara-paoa, ancient name of South Island, New Zealand, why so called, 127
  • Arai-toto-kore, or bloodless arai (probably rice), 12
  • Atia, identical with the Maori Irihia in Rarotongan traditions of the Fatherland, 9
  • Atia-te-varinga, identified as Java, 53
  • Atiu Island, Cook Group, some notes on, by Major J. T. Large, 67
  • BEST, ELSDON. Tuhoe—The Children of the Mist, 149; a Lone Land(N.Z.) and they who settled it, 151; Tuhoeland, 156; the original people of Tuhoeland and surrounding districts, 160; Manu-korihi and Tama-ahua, migrate to Taranaki, note on, 167
  • Books, etc., received by the Society during 1912, xii.
  • Bow and arrow (pere), said to have been used by original inhabitants of N.Z., 191
  • Canoes, names of, in which the Polynesians left their Fatherland and arrived at Tawhiti-roa island, 15; canoes, names of, leave Tawhiti-roa for Tawhiti-nui, 49
  • Canoe, great race of held at Tahiti (circa 1150), 50, 60, 197
  • Canoes, names of, and their captains by which the original inhabitants came to New Zealand, 190
  • Chatham Islands or Whare-kauri occupied by the Moriori, 193; Chatham Islands discovered by Toi-te-Huatahi (about 1150 A.D.), 199
  • Chiefs, names of, who led the people on their migration to Tawhiti-nui, 49
  • CHRISTIAN, F. W. “Some Hindustani cognates of the Maori, 77; “Te Taringa-roa,” a curious and widespread custom, 226
  • Cook, Captain, discovery of and landing at Cook Islands, 71
  • Cuckoo, The, made use of by early Polynesian navigators in discovery of new lands, 203
  • Dravidian race, theory of connection with the Polynesians, 9
  • DURRAD, Rev. W. J.(of the Melanesian Mission). A Tikopia Vocabulary, 86, 141
  • Exchanges, List of, x.
  • Fiji, arrival at (by Polynesians), 57
  • FLETCHER, Rev. H. J. Ngahue's ear-drop, 228
  • Folk-lore from Atiu Island, Cook Group, 74
  • Gangetic race, its possible connection with the Polynesians, 9
  • Grammar of the language of Ulawa, Solomon Islands, by Rev. W. G. Ivens, 28, 96, 134, 219
  • Hamilton, Augustus, a founder of the Society and Director of Dominion Museum, Wellington, New Zealand, Death of, 166.
  • Hawaiian Islands, discovered by Hawaii-loa, 21
  • Hawaii-loa, earliest known voyager of the Polynesian Race (is he identical with Tamarereti ?), 21; his voyages and discoveries, 21; he discovers the Hawaiian Islands, 21
  • Hawaiki-nui, traditional sight of the Deluge, and the overturning of the earth, 9
  • Hawaiki-rangi, old name of Hawaii Island of the Hawaiian group, 51
  • HENRY, MISS TEUIRA. The oldest great Tahitian Maraes and the last one built in Tahiti, 25
  • Hindustani Cognates of the Maori, Some, by F. W. Christian, 77; Notes on supposed, 225
  • Hine-te-ura, a daughter of Kupe and the Nakari or feast when taking possession of New Zealand, 129
  • Hoeroa, a weapon, 191
  • Huata, a spear, 191
  • Hui-te-rangi-ora, name given to a war in the Fatherland, 14
  • Hui-te-rangiora, the great voyager, 58; sails from Fiji Group to New Guinea, 59
  • India, The Fatherland of the Polynesians, 8
  • Invocation or karakia used in the making of the first canoe, “Uruao,” 19
  • Irapanga and his descendants sail across the North Pacific and land at Oahu, Hawaiian Group, about A.D., 450, 50 and 53
  • Irihia, the name given to the Fatherland by Ngati-Kahu-ngunu tribe of New Zealand, 9
  • Irihia, identical with Atia of the Rarotongan traditions of the Fatherland, 9
  • IVENS, Rev. W. G. Grammar of the language of Ulawa, Solomon Islands, 28, 96, 134, 219
  • JAMES, H. L. “Pathology of Samoa,” 80
  • Java, the first. Note by Taylor White, 105
  • JURY, J. W. In 1840 he records the very early migrations of Polynesians, 48
  • Kiwa, the great ocean of (the Pacific), 149
  • Knotted-cord, used by Polynesians for sending messages by birds, 202
  • Kumara Lore, dictated by Pita Kapiti and translated by Bishop W. L. Williams, D. D., 36
  • Kupe, the discovery of New Zealand by, 118; explores the South Island of New Zealand and discovers the pounamu or greenstone, 127; returns to the North Island of New Zealand and thence home to Rarotonga, 129
  • Kura-haupo canoe, her anchor used as a support for a house pillar at Oakura, 122
  • “Kura-hau-po” canoe leaves Tahiti for New Zealand under Whatonga, 207; incantation over before sailing, 208; description of, and names of crew, 208
  • Kura-nui, the name of place (in the Fatherland) from which the Polynesians departed by sea for the east, 9, 13; name of one of the canoes in which the Polynesians left their Fatherland, 15
- 234
  • Kuri Maori (the native dog), Notes on, 42, 43, 105
  • Kurutai, a stone weapon, 191
  • Lament. Inutoto's lament for her husband Paroro, 71
  • LARGE. MAJOR J. T. Some notes on Atiu Island, Cook Group, 67
  • Lone Land, A. Aotea-roa, or New Zealand, and they who settled it, by Elsdon Best, 151
  • Lore of the Whare-wananga, The, by H. T. Whatahoro, 1, 45, 107, 169
  • Mahu-rangi, one of the leaders in the migration from Tawhiti-roa to Tawhiti-nui, 40
  • Manu-Korlhi and Tama-ahu come to Taranaki, (New Zealand), about ten generations ago (from 1913), Notes on, 167
  • Maraes, the oldest great and the last one built in Tahiti, 25; story of their origin in Tahiti, 25
  • Mata-horua canoe, launched and sails for New Zealand from Rarotonga with Kupe and family, 123; her anchor left at Porirua harbour, New Zealand, 126
  • Matatua Canoe, arrives at Whakatane, New Zealand, and members of her crew marry aborigines, 160
  • Matorohanga, the sage, supplies the information on ancient Maori beliefs, 2
  • Maui family of brothers, their descent, 15
  • Members of Society, List of, v.
  • Migration from the Hawaiian Islands to Tahiti, 59
  • Moa, The, in the Wellington District, note by W. W. Smith, 42
  • MOHI TUREI, REV., Kumara Lore, 36; Taharaku, 62
  • Muturangi and Kupe at Rarotonga, 120; his pet Wheke (or Octopus) “Wheke-a-Muturangi,” 120
  • Naea, voyages from Tahiti to Hawaiian Islands (circa 1100), 60
  • Native dog, Note on, by Andrew Wilson, 42
  • Native dog, Note on, by W. W. Smith, 43
  • Native dog, introduced by early Polynesian voyagers to New Zealand, 159
  • NEPIA POHUHU, supplies information on ancient Maori beliefs, 2
  • New Zealand, story of its discovery, by Kupe and Ngake, 123; sailing directions for, given by Kupe to Turi, 131
  • Nagahue's Ear-drop. By Rev. H. J. Fletcher, 228; note on, by S. Percy Smith, 167
  • Ngake (or Ngahue) and Kupe leave Rarotonga for New Zealand, 123; his greenstone eardrop in the British Museum, note, 167
  • Ngana-te-ariki, who lived at Kuranui in Irihia, and his children, 13
  • Nga-Potiki tribe, the first occupants of Tuhoe-land, New Zealand, 156, 163
  • Ngati-Awa tribe (of New Zealand) migrate from East coast to Taranaki, 201, 214
  • Ngati-Kahu-ngunu tribe of New Zealand. A separate migration into the Pacific from Indonesia, 9
  • Ngati-Kaupeka and Ngati-Kopeka, a lanky, thin people, and Ngati-Kiwakiwa, Ngati-parauri and Ngati-uenga-rehu, a black people, who expelled the Polynesians from their Fatherland, 10, 51
  • Nga-Whatu (The Brothers' Rocks, Cook's Straits, New Zealand) reason for being very tapu, 127
  • Notes on supposed Hindu Cognates of the Maori. By Sidney H. Ray, 225
  • Notes and Queries, 42, 105, 167, 231
  • Nuku-Kere-i-manu, first Ariki of Atiu, Cook Group, 74
  • Obituary. Parker, J. H., a member of the Council of Society, 104
  • Obituary. Pope, J. H., a founder and one time President of Society, 166
  • Obituary. Hamilton, Augustus, a founder of the Society and Director of the Dominion Museum, New Zealand, 166, 230
  • Okoki, a canoe and a pa, 191
  • Pakaroa, the Home of Kupe in Rarotonga, 121
  • Pake, or kilt, 191
  • Pani, The wife of Rongo-maui, The myth of, 149
  • Parker, J. H., a member of the Council of Society, Obituary notice of, 104
  • Peka-hourangi, a principal tohunga of Rarotonga, 122
  • Pere, a weapon, probably an arrow, 191
  • PITA KAPITI. Kumara Lore, 36
  • Polynesian Vikings, The (verses), 149
  • Pope, J. H., a founder and one time President of Society, Obituary notice of, 166
  • Potato, The Maori, note on by H. D. Skinner, 43; by Taylor White, 105; by W. H. S. Roberts, 231
  • Proceedings of the Society, 44, 106, 168, 232
  • Proto-Aryans, connection with the Polynesians, 9
  • Rangi-atea Island, description of its ancient inhabitants, 204
  • Rata, flourished in Samoa and Fiji thirty-nine generations ago, probably same person as Kupe, 123
  • RAY, SIDNEY H. Notes on supposed Hindu Cognates of the Maori, 225
  • ROBERTS, W. H. S. The Maori Potato, 231
  • Rongo-marae-roa, god of peace and agriculture, 12
  • Rongorongo, daughter of Toto and wife of Turi, secures “Aotea” canoe for voyage to New Zealand, 131
  • Rua-Hatu-Tinirau, the Tahitian Neptune repairs the Maraes after the deluge, 25
  • Ruamano, great leader of Polynesians in the Tawhiti-roa war, 17
  • Saba, of south-east Arabia, assumed origin of name Hawaiki, 8
  • Samoa, Pathology of. By H. L. James, 80
  • Sindhava, an ancient name for India, 8
  • SKINNER, H. D. Note on the Maori (indigenous) potato, 43
  • SMITH, S. PERCY. Te Kauwae-Raro, translated by, 8, 48, 118; Ngahue's ear-drop, Note on, 167
  • SMITH, W. W. Note on the Maori dog, 43; Moa in the Wellington District, 42
  • Solomon Islands, Grammar of Ulawa, 29, 96, 134, 219
  • Stars, Poututerangi and Whanui, their connection with cultivation of the kumara, 40
  • Taharakau, by Mohi Turei, and translation by Archdeacon Williams, 62, 64
  • Tahiti (Hawaiki of the Maoris) discovered by Hui-te-rangiora, 58; migration to, from Hawaiian Islands, 59
  • Tahito-rangi, Tu-rongo-rau and Tu-te-Mahurangi, names of Polynesian leaders in migration from Tawhiti-roa to Tawhiti-nui, 49
  • Tama-ahua and Manu-korihi come to Taranaki about ten generations ago (from 1913). Note on, 167
  • Tama-nui-te-ra (a name for the sun) a god of the ancient Polynesians, 198
  • Tama-rereti, captain of the Uraao canoe, a great navigator, 18; is he identical with Hawaii-loa? 21
  • Tamatea-nui Canoe, came to New Zealand from Hawaiki-nui, 13
  • Tane-nui-rangi, the god-creator of the first woman, 12
  • Tangaroa-i-te-rupetu, whose children were the Maui brothers, 149
  • Tangata-whenua (or original inhabitants of New Zealand), a description of, 189; they land at Nga-motu, Taranaki, 190; names of canoes by which they come and their captains, 190; wars of extermination against, 193
- 235
  • Taneroa, Tonga-potiki and Turanga-i-mua, children of Turi, 131
  • Tangi-te-ruru and her children, etc., migrate from the Fatherland, 15
  • Taukata, brings the kumara or sweet potato to New Zealand, 155
  • Tauheke, son of Kopura and Hine-iro, flourished about 1690 A.D.—his genealogy—164
  • Tawhiri-rangi (or Tawhiri-kura) canoe in which Ngake voyages to New Zealand, 122
  • Tawhiti-roa island (probably Sumatra) occupied in the Polynesian migration, 16; the Polynesians leave for Tawhiti-nui, 48
  • Tawhiti-nui island occupied in Polynesian migration (probably Borneo), 15, 49, 52
  • Tawhiti-pa-mamao, a descriptive name of the Polynesian Fatherland, 9, 12
  • Te Hono-i-wairua, a temple in the Polynesian Fatherland, 9, 12
  • Te Kauwea-raro. Supplied by H. T. Whatahoro, translated by S. Percy Smith, 3, 48, 118, 189
  • Te Kohurau, name of cave-fort, built in Tawhiti-nui, 50
  • Te Matenga-o-tini-o-Pokaua, name of war against the people of Tawhiti-roa, 17
  • Te-Pua-Tea or Taputapu-atea marae, Tahiti, 26
  • “Te Taringa-roa.” A curious and wide-spread custom. By F. W. Christian, 226
  • Te Tupua-nui-o-Avaiki, a Polynesian ancestor who flourished ninety-five generations ago, or about 475 B.C.
  • Te Waka-o-Tama-rereti, name of the Constellation of Scorpio, 18
  • The oldest great Tahitian maraes and the last one built in Tahiti. By Miss Teuira Henry, 25
  • Tikopia. Vocabulary of. By Rev. W. J. Durrad, 86, 141
  • Tiwakawaka, the first man to settle in Tuhoeland, New Zealand, 160
  • Toi-te-Huatahi, lived in Tahiti twenty-eight generations back, 59
  • Toi, descent from. Genealogical tables, 168
  • Toi (Toi-kai-rakau), the wood eater, a descendant of Maui-mua, 150, 160
  • Toi-te-Huatahi, his migration from Hawaiki (Tahiti) to New Zealand, 196; he starts on his voyage, 198; has trouble with the original inhabitants, 200
  • To'o-a-ra'i, the last great marae built in Tahiti, 27
  • Tonga-porutu, origin of its name, 213
  • Tonga-whiti or Tonga-fiti migration from the Fatherland, 16
  • Toroa, captain of Matatua canoe, his daughter Wairaka marries an aboriginal of New Zealand, 160
  • Tribes of the Te Tini o Toi of inland Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, 162
  • Tuahiwi-o-Atea, one of the seven canoes in which the Polynesians left their Fatherland, 15
  • Te Moana-taupuru, one of the seven canoes in which the Polynesians left their Fatherland, 15
  • Te Karearea, one of the seven canoes in which the Polynesians left their Fatherland, 15
  • Tuhoe—The Children of the Mist. By Elsdon Best, 149
  • Tuhoeland. By Elsdon Best, 156
  • Tuhoeland, The original people of. By Elsdon Best, 160
  • Tu-raukawa, a learned man of Ngati-Ruanui, 190
  • Turehu, a fair or white people of Irihia (Fatherland), 14
  • Turi, presented by Toto with Aotea canoe for voyage to New Zealand, 131; the reason he leaves Rangi-atea Island for New Zealand, 217
  • Tu-te-rangiata, a very high and accomplished chief, settles in Tahiti, 58
  • Ui-te-rangiora (or Hui-te-rangoira), the great voyager, 59
  • Ulawa, Solomon Islands, Grammar of the language of, by Rev. W. G. Ivens, 28, 96, 134, 219; description of, 28
  • Uru, identified with Ur of the Chaldœans, 10; the people who caused the exodus of a branch of the Polynesians from their Fatherland, 10; very ancient inhabitants of India, 11; name of one of the canoes in which the Polynesians left the Fatherland, 15
  • Uruao canoe or vessel, the first built by the Polynesians, and its voyages, 18; incantation used in the making of, 15
  • Wai-haro-rangi, Wai-kumia, Wai-o-ngana and Wai-parauri names of battles that occurred in the Fatherland, 49
  • Whanganui and Patea rivers, New Zealand, discovered and sailed up by Kupe, 128
  • Whanganui-a-Tara, Te, Wellington harbour, New Zealand, first visited by Polynesians, 125
  • Whanui (the star Vega), Rongo-maui obtains the seed of the kumara from, 149
  • Whare-kura, the house of Rongo-marae-roa (god of peace, etc.), 12
  • Whare-wananga, The lore of the; Introduction by S. Percy Smith, 1
  • WHATAHORO, H. T. The Kauwae-raro, or lore of the Whare-wananga, 3, 107, 169
  • Whatonga and his nephew, Tu-rahui, blown to sea from Tahiti and land on Rangi-atea Island, 197; they return to Tahiti after many years, 202
  • Whatonga sails for New Zealand in the “Kura-hau-po, 207
  • “Wheke-a-Muturangi,” the pet octopus of Muturangi, the story of its chase to New Zealand and destruction by Kupe and Ngake, 123
  • WHITE, TAYLOR. Notes on “The first Java,” “The Maori Potatoe,” “The Kuri Maori,” 105
  • WILLIAMS, RIGHT REV. BISHOP W.L. Kumara Lore, translated by, 36
  • WILLIAMS, ARCHDEACON. Translation of “Taharakau,” 64
  • WILSON, ANDREW. Note on the Native dog (kuri Maori), 42