Volume 23 1914 > Index to Vol.XXIII, p 229-231
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- 229
INDEX TO VOL. XXIII.
  • Aka-aro-roa of Whanganui goes with Kahu to Chatham Islands, early thirteenth century, and finds it inhabited, 74
  • Annual meeting of the Society and report of the Council, i.
  • Ao-tea-roa. Name given to New Zealand by women of Taki-tumu canoe, 31
  • Atuas or gods, names of, placed on Taki-tumu at Tahiti, before sailing for New Zealand, 209
  • Awhio-rangi, the Toki-tapu (Sacred axe), brought by Taki-tumu canoe to New Zealand, 30 and 212
  • Awhio-rangi, the Toki-tapu, presented to Turi's daughter by Tamatea, as a marriage gift, 114
  • Axes, Names of, that hewed out “Takitimu” canoe, 200
  • BEST, ELSDON. Tuhoe, The Children of the Mist, 38, 84, 159; Camp of, at Ruatahuna, Photo of, 41
  • Books, etc., received by the Society during 1913, xi.
  • Borneo (North]. Natives of. Their story of Maui and the sun—Note on (No. 225), 227
  • Bowls, The game of. Did the Maoris indulge in a similar game—Note on (No. 252), 226
  • Chatham Islands, discovered by Toi-te-huatah, and visited by Kahu, 71; named Whare-kauri by Hine-te-waiwai, 74; names of canoes that reached there from Rarotonga, 76, 78; defeated people of Te-Tini-o-Tai-tawaro reach there in the twelfth century from New Zealand, 83
  • Canoe, method of dovetailing body portions together by the Maori, 119; Ancient method of preparing timber and building of same, 202
  • DOWNES, T. W. History of Ngati-Kahu-ngunu, 28, 111, 219; Pelorus Jack, or Tuhi-rangi, Maori traditions of, 176
  • Dog, The ancient Maori. By W. H. Skinner, 173
  • Exchanges, List of, ix.
  • Fairies or Turehu of the forests, 98
  • Genealogies—
  • Tama-ahua, 17
  • Tini-a-Toi and Nga-Potiki, 40A
  • Nga-Potiki tribe of Tuhoe, 40A
  • Toi, Hape, Potiki, Tuhoe, and others, 44A
  • Origin of Ngati-Rakei Hapu of Nga-Potiki, 44B
  • Ha, ancestor of Ngati-Ha, 48
  • Tama-kai-moana (Ngati-Huri), 53
  • Kapua-nui=Hine-uri-tara (Whanganui), 73
  • Aka-aro-roa=Te Para (Whanganui-Moriori), 74
  • Nga-maihi, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki, 84A
  • Rangi-monoa and Manu-nui-taraki of Nga-Potiki, 87
  • Hae-ora of Te Whakatane tribe, 88
  • Ngati-Maru, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki, 90A
  • Te Hapu-oneone, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki, 98A
  • Te Hapu-oneone, also Ngai-Te Kapo and Toroa, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki, 100 A
  • From Uenuku, A. D. 75 to Kahu-ngunu, A.D. 1350, 124
  • Gods (Polynesian), names of those taken to New Zealand in Taki-tumu canoe, 29
  • Grammar of the language of Ulawa, Solomon Islands, by Rev. W. G. Ivens, 21
  • Haddon, Dr. A. C., F.R.S., etc. “The hidden teaching of the Maori,” a Review, 55
  • Hape, ancestor of Te Hapu-oneone people of Tuhoe, comes to New Zealand in the Rangi- mataru canoe, 99
  • Hapus (or sub-tribes) of Nga-Potiki, a list of, 43
  • Hapu-oneone, Te, a sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki, History of, 98
  • Hatonga (or Whatonga), a son of Rauru, 39
  • Hawaiian Islands. First discovery of, by Europeans. Note on (No. 254), 227
  • Hidden teaching of the Maori, The. A review by Dr. A. C. Haddon, M.A., F.R.S., 55
  • Hine-korako, the goddess of the lunar rainbow, 140
  • Hine-pukohu-rangi, the lady of the Mist, lures Te Maunga to earth, 41
  • Horouta canoe sails with Taki-tumu canoe for New Zealand, 30; Its building by Pawa and others, 202
  • Hotu-roa, captain of Tainui canoe, lands on the coast of New Zealand, 31; Disputes with Tama-te-kapua, of Arawa canoe, over careas of dead whale, 31
  • Huri-whenua, name of temple in which sorcery was taught, 146
  • Ira-kai-putahi, is fed on the heart of his mother, by Uenuku his father, 143
  • Ivens, Rev. W. G., Grammar of the language of Ulawa, Solomon Islands, 21
  • Iwi-pupu, the wife of Tawatea, and her celestial lover, 139
  • Jadeite, or greenstone, names given to the various kinds by Hine-ahu, wife of Tama-ahua, 18
  • Kahu-koka returns to Hawaiki (or Tahiti) in Tane-kaha canoe, 81
  • Kahu-kura, the god of Tamatea, accompanies him on his travels, 111; lost in the Huka-nui falls, Taupo, 115
  • Kahu-ngunu and his father Tamatea land at Whanganui, N.Z., 113; is born to Uneku-rangi (the god) and Iwi-pupu, 140
  • Kape-whiti voyages to New Zealand from Chatham Islands, 80
  • Karakia or incantation—recited to subdue the ocean storms on voyages from Tahiti to New Zealand, 79; recited over the Tane-kaha canoe to remove all obstacles on its voyage from New Zealand to Tahiti, 81; termed a tapuwae to render a person fleet of foot, 167; recited over axes and workmen in building Taki-timu canoe, 200; recited by Rongo-patahi to cause the east winds to blow before Taki-timu sailed for New Zealand, 207; recited to calm the waves on voyage of Taki-timu to New Zealand, 217
  • Kumara Seed brought to New Zealand in canoe called “Te Karaerae,” 80; in Matatua and Taki-timu canoes, 99
  • Kupe. The navigator. His sailing directions from Hawaiian Islands to Tahiti and thence to New Zealand, 207
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  • Manaia, The coming of, to New Zealand, 9,12, 77; His doings at Hawaiki (Tahiti), 10
  • Maori arawhata or ladder. By W. W. Smith, 109; dog (Kuri Maori), The ancient. By W. H. Skinner, 173
  • Maru-iwi tribe of east coast of New Zealand, The story of, 159
  • Mara-papanui, ancestor of Ngati-Maru people of Nga-Potiki, 91
  • Maui and the Sun. The story of, by natives of North Borneo. Note on (No. 225), 227
  • Maunga-kahia pa, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand, its capture and death of its chief Kau-pa-ruru, 224
  • Maunga-pohatu Mountain, Tuhoe land, traditions of, 93
  • Members of Society, List of, iv.
  • Moeahu, the mythical monster, partly man and partly dog, 148
  • Ngati-kahu-ngunu Tribe. History of. By T. W. Downes, 28, 111, 219
  • Ngati-Ha, a hapu or sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 47
  • Ngati-Huri, or Tama-kai-moana, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 52
  • Ngati-Kuri, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 52
  • Nga-Maihi, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 84.
  • Ngati-Maru of Maunga-pohatu, sub-tribe of Nga-potiki. History of, 91
  • Ngati-Rakei, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 43
  • Ngai-Tua-hau, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 49
  • Ngai-Tumata-rakau, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 49
  • Ngai-Tumata-whero, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 52
  • Ngai-Tumata-wha, sub-tribe of Nga-Potiki. History of, 53
  • Ngai-Turanga, tribe of Tuhoe, 172
  • Ngati-Raukawa tribe, origin of its name, 219
  • Ngati-Wai-taha people or tribe and their chief Puhi-whanake, 32; discover and settle at Waiau river, South Island of New Zealand, 33
  • Ngati-Wai-toha, name of people who sailed Taki-tumu canoe to New Zealand, 30
  • Ngatoro-i-rangi, priest of Arawa canoe, raises a great tempest, 30
  • Niall, R. G. An ancient South American, Maori and Indian Custom. Note on, 58
  • Notes and Queries, 58, 226
  • Nuku-tama-roro leaves Tahiti in three canoes in pursuit of Manaia and follows to New Zealand, 13; returns to Hawaiki (Tahiti), 15
  • Obituary. Members of Society, 126
  • O-potiki (East coast of New Zealand), origin of name, 40
  • “Pelorus Jack,” or Tuhi-rangi, the whale of the French Pass. The Maori tradition of. By T. W. Downes, 176
  • Picture writing of the ancient Maori, 112
  • Pikopiko-i-whiti, ancient name of lagoon that encircles Tahiti, 203
  • Polynesians occupy Malay Archipelago before Christian Era, 107
  • Polynesian Philology. By Edward Tregear, 34; By Sidney H. Ray. A reply to Mr. Tregear, 154
  • Potiki, ancestor or founder of the Nga-Potiki tribe, 38
  • Proceedings of the Society, 59, 126, 228
  • Puhi-whaka-awe and his brother Puhi-whanake prepare the canoe Taki-tumu for voyage to New Zealand, 29, 199
  • Putiki, town of Wanganui, New Zealand, why so named, 113
  • “Pu-whenua,” original name of Taki-tumu—(Note 43), 218
  • Rakai-hiku-roa, a grandson of Kahu-ngunu, Story of, 219
  • Rangi-houa canoe, wrecked at Chatham Islands, on voyage from Tahiti, 1350 A. D.? 78
  • Rangi-monoa, an ancestor of Nga-Potiki, lives about 1600 A. D., 42, 87
  • Rangi-nui, eldest son of Tamatea and Iwi-pupu, 141
  • RAY, SIDNEY H. Polynesian Philology. A reply to Mr. Edward Tregear, 154
  • Review on “The Subanu; Studies of a Sub-Visayan Mountain Folk of Mindanao,” by Col. John Park Finlay, U.S.A., and William Churchill, 103; “Tehuti the Voyager,” by J. A. Goodchild, 150
  • Rua-wharo, a priest, steers or pilots Taki-tumu canoe to New Zealand, 30; assists with his sacred axe, Hui-te-rangiora, to build Taki-tumu canoe, 200
  • SKINNER, H. D. A review of Elsdon Best's work on “The stone Implements of the Maori,” 19
  • SKINNER, W. H. “The Ancient Maori Dog,” 173
  • SMITH, S. PERCY. “Te Kauwae-raro” or “Things terrestrial,” translated by, 9, 70, 138, 198
  • SMITH, W. W. A Maori arawhata or ladder—illustrated, 109
  • Song or lament of Te Kiri-kakahu on departure of Rangi-houa canoe from Tahiti to New Zealand, 78
  • Song or lament over Kiri-rangi, drowned in wreck of Rangi-houa canoe at Chatham Islands, 1350 A. D.? 78
  • Song used in the dragging of Taki-tumu canoe to the sea at Paka-roa, Tahiti, 204
  • Stone implements of the Maori, The, by Elsdon Best. A review of, by H. D. Skinner, 19
  • Subanu, The. Studies of a Sub-Visayan Mountain Folk, of Mindanas, by Col. John Parker Finlay, U.S.A., and Wm. Churchill. A Review of, 103
  • Taki-tumu Canoe. Carries Tama-tea to New Zealand, 28; story of its building and voyage to New Zealand, as told by Te Matorohanga, 198; dedication prayer or invocation over, prior to starting on its voyage to New Zealand, 212; sails out of lagoon Pikopiko-i-whiti, Tahiti, for New Zealand, 215; invocation to calm the storm on voyage, 217; reason why its name was changed from Pu-whenua to Taki-tumu (Note 43), 218
  • Tama-ahua, History of, and his wanderings in New Zealand. 15; goes in search of the Jadeite or pounamu, 17
  • Tamatea, a famous ariki and his canoe Taki-tumu, 28; preparation for and voyage to New Zealand, 205; his journeys and discoveries throughout, New Zealand, 111; and his wife Iwi-pupu, 139
  • Tama-te-kapua, captain of Arawa canoe claims carcas of dead whale from Hotu-roa of Tai-nui canoe, 31
  • Tara-ki-tai and Tara-ki-uta, twin sons of Kahu-tapere of Ngati-Kahu-ngunu, story of their murder and resulting wars, 220
  • Tehuti, the Egyptian voyager, circa seventeenth century B. C., identical with Tawhaki of Polynesian myth, 150
  • “Te Karaerae” canoe sails from Tahiti for New Zealand under command of Te Ahuru, and said to have been lost at sea, 205
  • Te Kauwae-raro. Supplied by H. T. Whatahoro and translated by S. Percy Smith, 9, 70, 138, 198
  • Te Matorohanga. Story of the Maoris in Tahiti before departure for New Zealand, 138
  • Temple of Kohurau. Priests of, 142
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  • Te Ririno Canoe. Said to have touched at Chatham Islands, fourteenth century, 83; wrecked at Te Au-miti (French Pass), D'-Urville Island, New Zealand, 205
  • Te Rongo-pa-tahi, the priest and grandson of Uenuku, sails in Taki-tumu canoe, 29
  • Te Uru-manono, name of Manaia's pa at Tahiti, and reason of his leaving same for New Zealand, 77
  • Te Whiti-a-Poutama, his doings in Tahiti in the fourteenth century, 143
  • Toi-kai-rakau, a famous ancestor of the Maoris, 100
  • Toi-te-huatahi, leaves Rarotonga for New Zealand, end of twelfth century, and discovers the Chatham Islands, 71
  • TREGEAR, EDWARD. Polynesian Philology, 34
  • Tuhi-Rangi, or “Pelorus Jack,” the whale of the French Pass, New Zealand. Maori traditions of, by T. W. Downes, 176
  • Tuhoe. The Children of the Mist. By Elsdon Best, 38, 84, 159
  • Tu-rongo and Mahina-rangi (his wife), of Ngati-kahu-ngunu, ancestors of various branches of Waikato, Arawa, and Wanganui tribes, 219
  • Tutakangahau, a learned man of Tuhoe, New Zealand, Photo of, 41
  • Tu-whare-toa, the progenetor of the Ngati-Tu-whare-toa tribe of Taupo, New Zealand, 170
  • Uenuku, the great chief and priest, cause of Manaia leaving Tahiti, 77
  • Uenuku-rangi, the god of the rainbow and his intercourse with Iwi-pupu the wife of Tamatea, 139
  • Uenuku-titi, daughter of Uenuku-rangi (the god) and Iwi-pupu, 141
  • Ulawa, Solomon Islands. Grammar of the language, by Rev. W. G. Ivens, 21
  • Voyages of the Polynesians. Note on (No. 253), 226
  • Warea, wife of Manaia, 10
  • Whare-kauri, name given to Chatham Islands, by Hine-te-waiwai, early in thirteenth century, 74
  • WHATAHORO, H. T. The Kauwae-roro or “Things terrestrial” Lore of the Whare-wananga, 1, 61, 127, 181
  • Whatonga, comes to New Zealand in Kura-hau-po canoe, 14
  • Wiro-nui, comes to New Zealand in Horo-uta canoe, 99