Volume 94 1985 > Volume 94, No. 1 > Notes and news, p 1-4
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THE JOURNAL OF THE POLYNESIAN SOCIETY
    VOLUME 94 No. 1 MARCH 1985
  • Notes and News 3
  • ALBERT J. SCHÜTZ
  • Accent and Accent Units in Māori: The Evidence from English Borrowings 5
  • LAMONT LINDSTROM
  • Personal Names and Social Reproduction on Tanna, Vanuatu 27
  • Shorter Communications 47
  • Reviews 77
  • Publications Received 89
  • Editors: ROSS CLARK and JUDITH HUNTSMAN
  • Review Editor: JULIE PARK
  • Editorial Assistant: LIONEL CROTHERS

Copyright © 1985 by the Polynesian Society (Inc.)

Department of Anthropology, University of Auckland, Private Bag, Auckland

ISSN 0032-4000

SHORTER COMMUNICATIONS
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    SHORTER COMMUNICATIONS
  • DEBORAH WAITE
  • Canoe Stern Carvings from the Solomon Islands 47
  • ROSALIND L. HUNTER-ANDERSON and YIGAL ZAN
  • “Where's the Fish?” Or, What Limited Size of Aboriginal Populations on Small Tropical Islands 61
  • SAMUEL H. ELBERT
  • Eighty Years Later: Dordillon's 1904-1932 Marquesan Dictionaries 67
    REVIEWS
  • Adams, Ron: In the Land of Strangers: A Century of European Contact with Tanna, 1774-1874. (Michael Myers) 77
  • Ebin, V. and D. A. Swallow: “The proper study of mankind . . .”— Great Anthropological Collections in Cambridge. (Marilyn Strathern) 79
  • Kauraka, K. (ed.): Tales of Manihiki. (A. R. T. Campbell) 80
  • Moore, David R.: The Torres Strait Collections of A. C. Haddon: A Descriptive Catalogue. (James Urry) 81
  • Schlesier, Erhard: Me'udana, Teil 2 Das Soziale Leben. (Ingrid Bell) 82
  • Specht, Jim: The Prehistoric Archaeology of Norfolk Island. (D. G. Sutton) 84

Indexed in CURRENT CONTENTS, Behavioral, Social and Managerial Sciences, INDEX TO NEW ZEALAND PERIODICALS and in ANTHROPOLOGICAL INDEX

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NOTES AND NEWS
History of the Society

At the Annual General Meeting on July 4, 1983, the Council of the Polynesian Society accepted a proposal from Professor M. P. K. Sorrenson to write a history of the Society for publication in its centenary year, 1992. Professor Sorrenson would like to hear from members and friends of the Society who might have papers or reminiscences on the Society and its publications. His address is c/- History Department, University of Auckland, Private Bag, Auckland, New Zealand.

Conference on Easter Island

Professor Roger Green reports:

The First International Congress: Easter Island and East Polynesia (1 Congreso Internacional Isla de Pascua y Polinesia Oriental) took place on Easter Island, September 6-11, 1984. It was organised by the Easter Island Research Institute (Centro de Estudios Isla de Pascua), an academic unit of the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism of the University of Chile, and was sponsored by that University, with additional financial assistance coming from the United States and the United Nations Development Programme. The conference attracted some 70 participants from all parts of the world, who presented a total of more than 60 papers to an audience which also included an additional 61 observers and eight students. Topic areas included “Cultural Change in Easter Island and Eastern Polynesia”, “Preservation, Restoration and Exhibition of the Archaeological Patrimony”, “Settlement, Subsistence and Environmental Reconstruction Systems in Easter Island”, “Easter Island Art and Symbolic Systems”, “Linguistics”, and “The Prehistory of Eastern Polynesia”. Workshops were held in Social Anthropology-Linguistics, Archaeology and Prehistory, Arts, and Preservation, Restoration and Conservation of the Archaeological Patrimony.

Major conference papers were given by Bengt Danielsson (“Enforced Acculturation in Eastern Polynesia”), Nicholas Stanley Price (“Excavation, Conservation and Restoration”), Thor Heyerdahl (“The Rongo-rongo Dilemma” and “The Moai Maea of Easter Island”), Roger Green (“The Human Settlement of the Pacific” and “Lapita and Polynesian Origins: Some New Directions”), Claudio Cristino (“The Easter Island Archaeological Survey: Recent Results”), John Flenley (“The Late Quaternary Vegetational History of Easter Island”) and Yosihiko Sinoto (“A Review of the Archaeological Investigations of the Southern Pacific and their Cultural Relationship in Polynesia”). Other overseas participants giving papers included Pierre Ottino and Emmanuel Vigneron, archaeologists from French Polynesia; Grant McCall, anthropologist, and Douglas Yen, ethnobotanist, from Australia; Adrienne Kaeppler, ethnologist, James Boutillier, historian, Charles Love, geologist, and - 4 William Ayres and Patrick Kirch, archaeologists, from the United States; and Atholl Anderson, archaeologist, and Nancy Pollock, anthropologist, from New Zealand. Numbers of participants from Chile and Easter Island (including staff of the Research Institute) also gave papers, among them Sergio Rapu (archaeologist and Provincial Governor of Easter Island), Edmundo Edwards, Andrea Seelenfreund, Patricia Vargas, Jorge Paoa and Fernand Igualt.

The conference, despite its location in a remote and still somewhat isolated outpost in this part of the world, proved to be a huge success in bringing together an otherwise scattered group of researchers with common interests. For one and all, Easter Island lived up to its reputation in providing a unique experience. The staff of the Easter Island Research Institute are to be congratulated for their enterprise and organisation.

Archives and Records Association of New Zealand

Jane McRae reports:

The 1984 ARANZ Conference was held in New Plymouth from August 16-19, hosted by Taranaki Museum. The two themes adopted were “Maori History and Resources” and “Resources for Regional Research”. Some 100 members attended the conference, which, with respect to the Maori section, provided a rare and valuable meeting place for exchange of ideas and information between Maori and Pakeha academic and amateur researchers, archivists and librarians.

Those who contributed on Maori topics were: Graham Butterworth, assessing oral history as biography; Jane McRae, with a critique of the management of Maori materials in libraries and archives; Brian Herlihy, itemising the records held in the Aotea District Land Court; Jonathan Dennis, with a presentation of Maori films from the New Zealand Archive; Richard Hill, on the role of 19thcentury Maori police; and Sharon Dell, with a report on the kinds of Maori material in the Alexander Turnbull Library. In a paper which reflected both themes, Ruka Broughton discussed the writing of a history of his tribe, the Ngaa Rauru. Conference papers will be published in Archifacts.

Contributors of Articles in this Issue

Albert J. Schütz received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1962, and since that time has been teaching at the University of Hawaii. In 1984 he spent six months as Gastprofessor at the Seminar für Indonesische and Südseesprachen, Universität Hamburg.

Lamont Lindstrom received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Tulsa. He began field work in Vanuatu in 1978, and has recently finished a dictionary of the Kwamera language of Tanna. During 1984-5, he is an Area Studies Fellow at the Institute of Culture and Communication, East-West Center, Honolulu.